Daily Digest

Bill that creates ‘fundamental shift’ in North Carolina solar policy moves forward

SOLAR: North Carolina lawmakers advance a bill that mandates a competitive-bidding process for utility-scale solar construction and encourages rooftop and community solar projects, with one lawmaker saying it is “a fundamental shift in energy policy in North Carolina.” (Charlotte Business Journal, Progressive Post)

ALSO: A Chinese engineering company has chosen the Carolinas to build several sites with thousands of solar panels. (Charlotte Business Journal)

NUCLEAR:
• A fourth extension for an interim agreement between Georgia Power and Westinghouse over the Vogtle plant extends the deadline to Friday. (Augusta Chronicle)
A federal committee filed a letter late Monday with the U.S. bankruptcy court saying it may investigate the possible sale of Westinghouse Co. assets to foreign businesses. (Post and Courier)
The Public Service Commission is asking Georgia’s attorney general whether it would be legal for Georgia Power to stop charging its customers for the Vogtle nuclear power expansion project. (WABE)

CLIMATE:
• County commissioners in South Florida denounced President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris accord and voted to take action to reduce greenhouse gases and rising sea levels. (Sun Sentinel)
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper signs on to a letter supporting the Paris climate accord. (Greensboro News & Record)
Meanwhile, North Carolina’s attorney general says the U.S. exit from the Paris Agreement is dangerous for the environment and economy. (BPR)
A Republican candidate for governor promises to reverse Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s recent actions in Virginia to fight climate change. (Roanoke Times)

OIL AND GAS: Jurors heard testimony against Fayetteville Shale from a plaintiff who says she was underpaid for the use of her land during a natural-gas boom in Arkansas. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)

UTILITIES:
• North Carolina’s attorney general is intervening in Duke Energy’s request for an average 15 percent rate increase for some consumers. (WRAL)
Regulators will meet later this month about Mississippi Power’s request to hold maintain an earlier rate increase to pay for its $7.5 billion Kemper plant. (Associated Press)

COAL ASH: State officials have approved Duke Energy’s plan to close and empty a coal ash pond at a Kentucky power plant. (Associated Press)

COAL:
• Federal mine safety officials will discuss recent coal mining deaths and regulatory issues on Thursday at a meeting in West Virginia. (Associated Press)
A small Kentucky town has formed a network of local organizations to move its economy beyond coal. (Yes! Magazine)

EFFICIENCY: A county in Virginia will continue switching to more energy efficient vehicles to its fleet after seeing significant cost savings on fuel. (Virginia Gazette)

COMMENTARY: “Florida doesn’t have to retreat” on fighting climate change. (Sun Sentinel)

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