Daily Digest

Carbon trading in the works for states that don’t cut emissions

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• The EPA says it will impose an enforceable carbon trading program on states refusing to comply with their emissions cuts under the plan. (ClimateWire)
• The governors of Kentucky and West Virginia are facing growing pressure to reject the plan’s carbon emissions targets. (Greenwire)
By making states’ targets in the plan more workable and more stringent, the EPA may have strengthened its legal foundation. (InsideClimate News)

NATURAL GAS: The once-expected role for gas as the bridge to cleaner energy is no longer a key tenet of the Clean Power Plan. (The Hill)

NORTH CAROLINA:
• The Clean Power Plan gains support from companies with North Carolina ties. (Charlotte Business Journal)
• North Carolina will have to reduce carbon emissions from power plants by 36 percent under the Clean Power Plan. (Charlotte Business Journal)
• Power generators are well positioned to meet the state’s emissions targets under the Clean Power Plan. (Greensboro News & Record)

GEORGIA: Both of the state’s U.S. senators blasted the Clean Power Plan. (Albany Herald)

WEST VIRGINIA: Reaching the Clean Power Plan carbon emissions reduction of 37 percent in the Mountaineer state will be tough but not impossible, a West Virginia University professor asserts. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

NUCLEAR:
• The Clean Power Plan enables new reactors to count more toward meeting federal emissions limits. (Bloomberg Business)
• Duke Energy’s spending on its proposed Lee nuclear plant remains slow, raising questions about whether it will ever build it. (Charlotte Business Journal)

CLIMATE: Has burning natural gas instead of coal helped the U.S. economy decarbonize? It’s complicated. (Scientific American)

SOLAR:
• Tampa Electric said it will build a 25 megawatt solar system at its Big Bend Power Station in Apollo Beach. (Saint Peters Blog)
Isle of Wright County in Virginia is considering hosting a large solar system and selling the power to Dominion Virginia Power. (The Daily Press)

PIPELINES: The U.S. Forest Service has lodged hundreds of concerns about the proposed route of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline through national forests in Virginia and West Virginia. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

COAL:
• More than 1,000 Patriot Coal workers in West Virginia and elsewwhere have been informed they may lose their jobs. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
• An archival project examines the history and culture of coal mining communities in eastern Kentucky. (Western North Carolina Public Radio)

UTILITIES: Entergy is moving to boost earnings by better serving Gulf Coast industrial customers with an expanded power grid. (The Times-Picayune)

COMMENTARY:
• New offshore energy production is important for Florida’s economy. (Sun Sentinel)
• The Clean Energy Plan could be a bright day for solar in Virginia. (Public News Service)

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