Daily Digest

Florida Supreme Court approves solar choice for ballot

SOLAR: The Florida Supreme Court authorizes a pro-solar choice amendment for the state’s 2016 election ballot if backers can gather the required 680,000+ signatures by February 1. (Palm Beach Post)

ALSO: The Florida Chamber of Commerce denounces the Supreme Court decision authorizing the pro-choice amendment, saying it’s the wrong way to enable a solar market in Florida. (Saint Peters Blog)

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
Both North and South Carolina and Louisiana are among 25 or more states expected to sue to block implementation of the plan after it is formally published today. (The Energy Fix; The New York Times)
• An Arkansas utility executive warns about the costs of complying with the plan if natural gas prices spike. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)

NUCLEAR: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission grants the TVA a long-sought license for its Watts Bar 2 reactor to begin operations. (Chattanooga Times Free Press)

CLIMATE: Wood-burning plants in the Southeast U.S. could play a significant role in the Paris climate talks starting next month. (Climate Central)

WIND: Here’s how offshore wind energy systems can get real traction in the U.S. (Climate Progress)

PIPELINES: A legal battle over the Virginia route proposed for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline goes to court. (Staunton News-Leader)

BLANKENSHIP TRIAL: A key witness says former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship believed it would cost less to pay fines than to deploy safety measures. (Associated Press)

COAL: The coal industry is taking a wait-and-see approach with an automated railroad braking system that is required to be operational by January 1. (Platts)

2010 GULF OIL SPILL: The owner of the drilling rig involved in the oil spill is paying Alabama $20 million to resolve legal claims related to the disaster. (Associated Press)

UTILITIES: TECO Energy sets Dec. 3 to vote on its sale to Canadian power company. (The Tampa Tribune)

COMMENTARY:
• An opponent of consumer solar choice in Florida lays out a curious argument against the now-authorized election ballot amendment. (Palm Beach Post)
• The head of a non-profit in Florida shares her frustrations in educating the public about what climate change is doing to the Sunshine State. (Miami Herald)
South Carolina is a stark example of what happens if elected officials reject efforts to make the state more resilient to climate change. (Climate Science & Policy Watch)

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