Daily Digest

North Carolina to decide fate of new power plant today

UTILITIES:
Today is the deadline for North Carolina regulators to decide the fate of Duke Energy’s bid for three new gas-fired generators in Asheville. (WSOC-TV)
Duke Energy is set to break ground Wednesday on a new gas-fired power plant in central Florida. (Oil and Gas 360)

CLIMATE:
• Members of a Louisiana tribe are the first official climate refugees in the continental U.S., receiving $48 million to relocate. (The Weather Channel)
• An environmental group lists Tampa Bay among top 10 U.S. regions most threatened by climate change. (Politifact Florida)
Rising sea levels are driving up costs to maintain water supply systems along Florida’s coast. (Florida Water Daily)

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COAL ASH:
• Environmental groups move to block Dominion Virginia Power from dumping coal ash wastewater into rivers. (Southern Environmental Law Center)
• A South Carolina bill blocking out-of-state coal ash at certain landfills is ready for the Governor’s signature. (WYFF-TV)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: The federal government is finalizing a new rule aimed at preventing the type of undersea oil well blowout that led to the 2010 BP spill. (The Hill)

EDUCATION: The West Virginia House blocks new science standards because they mention climate change. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

STORAGE: A battery plant in Florida illustrates the challenges of government stimulus programs during rapid technological change. (The Washington Post)

CLEAN POWER PLAN: The Virginia Chamber of Commerce joins 166 other business organizations supporting a lawsuit aimed at stopping the plan. (WRIC-TV)

TECHNOLOGY:Charlotte company hires a financial adviser to sell its  cooling-tower business. (Charlotte Business Journal)

SOLAR:
• An engineer in North Carolina combines his passion for clean energy and rescuing pets with a rooftop solar system on an animal hospital. (Asheville Citizen-Times)
• A Virginia city councilman urges his town to “take things into our own hands” on solar. (WHSV-TV)

POLLUTION: Officials in a Kentucky county are furious after learning out-of-state radioactive waste has been dumped locally. (The Exponent Telegram)

COAL:
• The Kemper coal-gasification power plant in Mississippi faces new litigation over its rising costs. (Atlanta Business Chronicle)
• The Sierra Club appeals to Entergy to close two coal-fired power plants Arkansas. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)
• An importer sues a railroad to break terms of a contract involving coal destined for power plants in Georgia, Virginia and the Carolinas. (SNL)
• A contested tax credit approved by Virginia lawmakers is set for the Governor’s signature. (The Roanoke Times)

PIPELINES:
• A judge denies a motion by Virginia landowners to delay the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. (The News Virginian)
• A coalition unveils an online tool to spotlight environmental risks of the proposed  Atlantic Coast Pipeline. (Augusta News Leader)
• West Virginia land owners step up attacks against a bill that would enable land surveys for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline. (WVVA-TV)

COMMENTARY:
• There’s ample evidence about how the coal industry really runs West Virginia. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
• A retired construction company president says the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline is key to local job growth in southwestern Virginia. (The Roanoke Times)
• The man largely responsible for promoting the first U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas was fired last year from the company leading the push. (USA Today)
• A pastor in Virginia cites the disproportionate burden on minorities from air polluted by coal-fired power plants. (The Daily Progress)
• The head of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce cites the benefits of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline to local businesses. (The Virginian-Pilot)

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