Daily Digest

Official asks to exclude Virginia from offshore drilling

OFFSHORE DRILLING: Virginia’s Lieutenant Governor breaks ranks with other state leaders and asks federal officials to exclude the state from leases sales. (The Virginian-Pilot)

FRACKING: A Florida Senate committee narrowly rejects a bill that would allow the state, not local governments, to regulate fracking operations. (News 13)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join resiliency stakeholders and problem solvers from state and local government, businesses, universities, and the military in the first statewide Resilient Virginia Conference, March 22-23 in Richmond, Virginia. Register today to build Virginia’s resilient future!***

SOLAR:
• Mississippi regulators try to avert a bid by electric co-ops to avoid payments for excess power generated by rooftop solar systems. (Associated Press)
• A new report by the North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center finds 46 states considered actions in 2015 affecting distributed solar power. (Greentech Media)
• Entergy is testing in New Orleans its first utility-scale system with a battery to back it up. (Next City)

CLIMATE: The West Virginia House moves to delay new science educational standards amid its doubts about global warming. (Associated Press)

SUSTAINABILITY:
• Arkansas State University signs a $15 million contract to improve campus sustainability. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)
• Virginia Tech tries to educate students renting apartments to get smart about the energy and water they use. (Collegiate Times)

POLLUTION:
Discharges from Lake Okeechobee of toxic water from utilities and other businesses into rivers are finding their way to coastal beaches. (Climate Progress)
• Dominion Virginia Power is allowed to release toxic chemicals at triple the levels considered harmful to fish in the James River. (WWBT)
• Kentucky moves to prevent further illegal dumping of radioactive materials from other states. (Louisville Courier-Journal)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Experts say the Nissan Leaf is easier to hack than one might think. (Palm Beach Post)

COAL:
• Federal inspectors issue 138 safety citations at mines in 12 states, including Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia. (Associated Press)
• A former Kentucky congressman stresses the need to develop clean energy industries. (WFPL Public Radio)

UTILITIES:
• The North Carolina Utilities Commission sets a July 18 hearing on Duke Energy’s proposed acquisition of Piedmont Natural Gas. (Charlotte Business Journal)

NUCLEAR: Workers at a Georgia reactor look to attract a new crop of female engineers. (The Augusta Chronicle)

OIL & GAS:
• A bill in West Virginia to force property owners to sell drilling rights stalls. (West Virginia Public Broadcasting)
• The West Virginia House approves tax cuts for the coal and natural gas industries. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

PIPELINES:
• A West Virginia Senate committee approves a bill that would give pipeline surveyors automatic access to private properties. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
• A new study paid for by its developer finds the Palmetto Pipeline would be a magnet for new business in the Southeast. (WJCT Public Radio)

2010 BP OIL SPILL: A former BP rig supervisor is found not guilty of a misdemeanor pollution charge. (Associated Press)

COMMENTARY:
• An editorial spotlights several legislative bills important to coal mining in Kentucky. (Lexington Herald-Leader)
• A community activist in Florida underscores the need for local and state solar incentives. (Tallahassee Democrat)
• An activist in Georgia shares why she fights for environmental justice. (Southern Alliance for Clean Energy)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *