Daily Digest

Opponents lay out plans to fight Clean Power Plan

CORRECTION: Yesterday’s news digest misstated the name of North Carolina’s previous governor. It is Bev Perdue.

CLEAN POWER PLAN:
• Opponents’ first court tactic is to seek a stay that would stall enforcement of President Obama’s signature environmental initiative. (The Hill)
•  Senators opposed to the plan are pushing for resolutions to undo it despite a certain veto from President Obama. (The Hill)
• House opponents plan a roundabout way of subverting the EPA rule. (Think Progress)
• Nine environmental and health groups are asking a federal court to let them defend the plan against an onslaught of opposing lawsuits. (The Hill)
• Bucking calls by leading Republicans, West Virginia Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin says his administration will submit a plan for reaching its emissions target. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

SOLAR: The biggest donor yet to a solar power ballot initiative in Florida backed by utility companies won’t disclose its supporters. (Miami Herald)

POLICY: Market rules for clean power need to change, some states say. (Climate Central)

CLIMATE:
• Al Gore says he’s “genuinely curious” why Florida Gov. Rick Scott isn’t acting to mitigate climate change in a state at risk from rising sea levels. (Politico)
• Florida, Louisiana and North Carolina are most at risk from rising sea levels;  other Southeast states aren’t far behind. (Climate Central)

NUCLEAR: What killed America’s nuclear renaissance? (Bloomberg)

UTILITIES: An industry consultancy says Florida Power & Light is the most reliable electric utility. (Smart Grid News)

FRACKING: A plan to search for oil and gas in North Florida is stoking fears that  fracking could come to areas around the fragile Apalachicola and Chipola rivers. (WTSP Tallahassee)

COAL:
• In rare public comments, the president of Appalachian Power says coal is not coming back because the economics of power generation rule it out. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
• The Carter Roag Coal Co. informs its 170 employees in West Virginia they will be laid off by Christmas. (Associated Press)
• Conservation groups challenge the Army Corps of Engineers’ authorizing coal-mining material to be dumped into streams that feed into the Black Warrior River in Alabama. (Southern Environmental Law Center)
• Republicans challenge the Obama administration’s estimates of 300 job losses tied to a new rule to protect streams from mountaintop coal removal. (The Hill)

PIPELINES: The EPA tells developers of the proposed Sabal Trail Pipeline through Georgia to find a new route. (Atlanta Business Chronicle)

2010 GULF OIL SPILL: A new study links damage to coral reefs off the Alabama and Mississippi coasts to the BP spill. (Associated Press)

COMMENTARY:
• Modernizing the electrical grid in North Carolina requires open minds. (Asheville Citizen Times)
Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul explains his bid to require a super majority approval of any initiative resulting from the U.N. climate talks in December. (Floyd County Times)
• The solar industry has matured enough to continue growing without the federal investment tax credit. (Seeking Alpha)

Comments are closed.