Daily Digest

Supporters seek federal lifeline for Georgia nuclear project

NUCLEAR: Efforts to give hundreds of millions of dollars in tax credits to the Vogtle nuclear project in Georgia seem stuck in the U.S. Senate as lawmakers look at a broader tax overhaul. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

ALSO:
• Supporters of Georgia’s troubled Vogtle nuclear plant are asking the Trump administration to help the project to ensure its completion. (Bloomberg)
• An analysis says it is likely that future plans to build full size nuclear reactors in the U.S. “are now being put on indefinite hold.” (Energy Collective)
• There are job fairs being held this week following the abandonment of South Carolina’s Summer nuclear plant project, which put about 6,000 people out of work. (Post and Courier)

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FERC: New FERC chair Neil Chatterjee said Monday that coal and nuclear plants must be compensated properly “to recognize the value they provide to the system.” (Washington Examiner)

COAL: The EPA plans to do away with a measure limiting water pollution from coal-fired power plants. (Associated Press)

TRANSPORTATION: The Trump administration has started the process of rolling back U.S. fuel standards for cars and light trucks by opening a public comment period. (NPR)

OIL & GAS:
• The West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association wants state lawmakers to pass legislation next year to align “co-tenancy” rules with neighboring states. (State Journal)
• The official public comment period on restarting offshore drilling off North Carolina’s coast ends this week. (Public News Service)

PIPELINES: A Hare Krishna community in West Virginia has a symbiotic relationship with companies constructing natural gas pipelines near its shrines. (Pittsburgh Post Gazette)

RENEWABLE ENERGY: The city of Orlando hopes to be powered completely by renewable energy sources by 2050. (Orlando Sentinel)

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