Daily Digest

Virginia DEQ defends review process for pipeline

PIPELINES: The head of Virginia’s DEQ says “we are going way above and beyond” in determining what impact two pipelines projects would have on water quality, though environmental groups disagree. (Associated Press)

ALSO: More than two dozen faith leaders in Virginia have signed a letter opposing the proposed Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley Pipelines projects. (Augusta Free Press)

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SOLAR:
• Certain language in a solar bill passed by the North Carolina House and being considered by the Senate applies only to two Duke utilities. (Charlotte Business Journal)
The PACE home improvement financing program says a lawsuit filed by customers, including those in Florida, is flawed and should be dismissed. (Sun Sentinel)
Erosion from heavy rain at a solar farm on Air Force property in Florida has released sediment into nearby waters. (Northwest Florida Daily News)
South Carolina Electric & Gas Co. is launching a 16 MW community solar program, which will be the state’s largest. (Associated Press)
North Carolina is second among states for the new solar capacity it added during the first quarter, according to a new industry report. (Triad Business Journal)
• Dominion Energy is adding six new sites to its Solar for Students program, which installs small solar arrays for students to study. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)
• Environmental benefits and economic incentives are prompting some South Carolina homeowners to install solar panels. (Coastal Observer)

NUCLEAR:
• Dominion Energy says it probably won’t decide for many years whether to build a third reactor at its North Anna Power Station in Virginia. (Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star)
• Documents show how Southern Co. failed to anticipate how difficult the Vogtle project would become. (E&E News)

COAL:
• Alpha Natural Resources plans to open a new underground metallurgical coal mine in West Virginia this summer. (Associated Press)
• Seven coal miners in the U.S., including miners West Virginia and Kentucky, have died in job-related accidents this year and most lacked mining experience, as federal officials are launching a voluntary training initiative in response to the deaths. (Associated Press, Charleston Mail-Gazette)

RENEWABLE ENERGY: Researchers, including at the University of Arkansas, are studying ways to improve the storage of energy generated by renewable sources. (phys.org)

NATURAL GAS: A shipment of liquefied natural gas from Louisiana arrived in Poland Thursday and is the country’s first ever from the United States. (Advocate)

COMMENTARY:
• A columnist praises a solar bill passed by the North Carolina House, saying “what is good for renewable energy is good for the state.” (News & Record)
Even though West Virginia needs to increase its renewable energy production, a rise in coal and natural gas production is good news. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)
Solar power in South Carolina “is no longer a pipe dream. It’s becoming a growing business.” (Aiken Standard)

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