North Carolina joins multi-state climate alliance

CLIMATE: North Carolina becomes the fifteenth state to join the U.S. Climate Alliance, as the group announces it is on track to meet Paris accord targets despite the Trump administration. (News & Observer, InsideClimate News)

ALSO: An analysis looks at how much these states really can do on climate by themselves without help from the federal government. (New York Times)

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COAL ASH: Environmental groups are threatening to sue Duke Energy to force online access to federally mandating maps outlining what would happen if any of the utility’s coal ash dams failed. (Associated Press)

NUCLEAR:
• As the nuclear power industry struggles to hold on to its share of the country’s electricity production, some experts say as many as half of the nation’s 99 nuclear reactors could be shut down in the coming decades. (Reuters)
• Nuclear energy advocates are pinning their hopes on the Trump administration and a Republican lawmaker from Georgia to champion nuclear tax credits worth hundreds of millions of dollars. (E&E News)

STORAGE: Duke Energy plans to install its first large-scale battery storage units in 2019 in two locations in North Carolina.

Georgia regulators vote to move forward on Vogtle nuclear plant’s plan

NUCLEAR: Georgia regulators on Tuesday voted unanimously to accept Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction on the troubled Plant Vogtle expansion, despite warning that is might not be in the best interest of ratepayers. (Savannah Morning News)

ALSO:
• Meanwhile, whether or not to actually continue construction at the troubled Vogtle nuclear plant expansion project won’t be decided next February. (WABE)
• Westinghouse Electric Company says it will be exiting the nuclear reactor construction business, after filing for bankruptcy in March in relation to the now-abandoned Summer nuclear project in South Carolina. (InsideSources)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Microsoft, Facebook, Walmart and other key players in Southeast energy at Infocast’s Southeast Renewable Energy Summit – November 1-3 in Atlanta. Register today!***

SOLAR: A North Carolina appeals court upholds a fine against a nonprofit that installed solar panels on a church, saying they illegally acted as a public utility by selling the electricity produced. (Charlotte Business Journal)

NET METERING: A group convened by Arkansas’s Public Service Commission to examine net metering did not reach a consensus and has submitted two sets of recommendations.

Virginia moves forward on pipeline permits as other states pause

PIPELINES: Virginia’s DEQ says it does not plan to slow down the process for two proposed pipeline projects despite requests from state lawmakers, opposition from environmental groups, and delays imposed in West Virginia and North Carolina. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

ALTERNATIVE FUEL: North Carolina advocates want the state to revoke a permit for a proposed biomass wood pellet facility, raising questions about climate benefits and local environmental impacts. (Southeast Energy News)

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NUCLEAR: Santee Cooper’s retiring CEO said on Monday that South Carolina’s unfinished nuclear reactors should not be sold and the project could be finished in the future. (The State)

GOVERNMENT: North Carolina’s Oil & Gas Commission plans to meet this week despite Gov. Roy Cooper questioning whether it can legally do so. (BPR)

NET METERING: The Sierra Club in Arkansas says proposed changes in net metering could discourage customers who use solar power. (Arkansas Times)

UTILITIES: Florida Power & Light is being hit with a class action lawsuit over power outages from Hurricane Irma.

Audit could prevent rate hikes for South Carolina nuclear plant

NUCLEAR: South Carolina lawmakers were told that an audit that was recently made public could thwart SCANA’s attempt to charge customers for the now-abandoned Summer project. (Post and Courier)

RENEWABLE ENERGY: Virginia regulators have rejected Appalachian Power’s bid to offer ratepayers electricity supplied 100% by renewable energy sources at an undetermined rate, saying the utility failed to prove its plan is in the public interest. (Southeast Energy News)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Microsoft, Facebook, Walmart and other key players in Southeast energy at Infocast’s Southeast Renewable Energy Summit – November 1-3 in Atlanta. Register today!***

HURRICANE IRMA:
• A look at Florida Power & Light’s post-Hurricane Irma restoration efforts in light of the multi-billion grid upgrades it made prior to the disaster. (Palm Beach Post)
• Some Florida homeowners were able to go off-grid by using energy storage with solar panels, showing how distributed power could help during future disasters. (Inside Climate News)
• Much of the debris from Irma will be used to generate electricity in Florida.

Florida governor remains lukewarm on climate change

PIPELINES: North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper’s administration is delaying until mid-December its decision on whether to permit the controversial Atlantic Coast Pipeline project, requesting additional information on its potential impact on more than 300 nearby waterways. (Southeast Energy News)

ALSO:
• Police issued summonses to 19 people protesting proposed natural gas pipeline projects at the Virginia DEQ main office after they refused to leave. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)
• Hundreds of faith leaders in seven cities in Virginia gathered to protest the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley pipelines. (Blue Virginia)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Microsoft, Facebook, Walmart and other key players in Southeast energy at Infocast’s Southeast Renewable Energy Summit – November 1-3 in Atlanta. Register today!***

HURRICANE IRMA:
• A Florida Power & Light official said Thursday that the utility hopes to restore power by Sunday evening to residents affected by Hurricane Irma. (Sun Sentinel)
• Florida Gov. Rick Scott is still facing criticism over his stance on global warming in the wake of Hurricane Irma, while President Trump seems to be downplaying the relationship, saying, “We’ve had bigger storms than this.” (Politico, Miami Herald)

RENEWABLE ENERGY:
• The new FERC Chairman said Thursday that the nation’s electricity grid watchdog will evaluate whether to help preserve coal and nuclear plants during the transition to renewable energy sources.

Tankers boost gas supplies in Florida, millions still without power

HURRICANE IRMA: Oil tankers are streaming into Florida’s ports to meet the gasoline spike as Hurricane Irma evacuees return to the state. (News Service of Florida)

ALSO:
• Florida Power & Light estimates power will be almost fully restored in the state by Sept. 22, but is “overwhelmed” by the volume of customer inquiries. (Sun Sentinel)
• Some of Florida Power & Light Co.’s nuclear power plants remain inactive – but undamaged – from Hurricane Irma. (TC Palm)
• The Department of Homeland Security official said efforts following Hurricane Irma will be to rebuild power infrastructure rather than repair it.

More than 7.3 million without power as utilities respond to outages caused by Irma

HURRICANE IRMA: More than 7.3 million customers in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama were without power on Monday, while fuel prices fell as Hurricane Irma is likely to reduce demand for gasoline and diesel. (Reuters)

ALSO:
• Florida Power & Light on Monday began responding to power outages across the state as the White House urged patience, saying power could be out for weeks. (South Florida Business Journal, McClatchy)
• U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida called for the Department of Energy to create a separate gasoline supply reserve for his state following Hurricane Irma. (SaintPetersBlog)
• Regulators issue a waiver for Florida electricity companies to violate clean air and water standards without penalty for the next two weeks as they maintain and restore power. (Associated Press)
• Florida Power & Light said customers were not affected by a partial shutdown of its Turkey Point nuclear power plant in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Irma cuts power to millions, Florida utility says restoring service will be complex

HURRICANE IRMA: Power has been knocked out for at least 4.5 million customers in Florida and some people may go without power for weeks as parts of the grid may need to be rebuilt “from the ground up.” (Bloomberg)

ALSO:
• Florida Power & Light says it may take weeks or longer to restore power, as utility crews from out of state arrive in Florida to help. (Sun Sentinel, Reuters)
• Hurricane Irma tests $3 billion worth of power grid upgrades that Florida Power & Light made in recent years. (Bloomberg)
• Florida Power & Light shut down a reactor at its Turkey Point nuclear plant in preparation for Hurricane Irma. (Miami Herald)
• The Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Friday sent additional inspectors to the Turkey Point and St. Lucie nuclear plants in Florida in preparation for Hurricane Irma, which poses the toughest test yet for U.S. nuclear power plants since Japan’s nuclear accident in 2011.

Utilities prepare for major damage to Florida’s grid

HURRICANE IRMA: As Florida Power & Light prepares for Hurricane Irma, it anticipates that much of the grid may have to be rebuilt, with a spokesperson saying, “No grid is designed to be able to withstand a category 5 storm.” (WLRN)

ALSO:
• More than 1,800 stations in Florida metropolitan areas were without fuel late Thursday, as Gov. Rick Scott announced fuel availability is a top priority and that state police will escort delivery trucks to gas stations along evacuation routes. (Bloomberg)
• Oil prices steadied on Friday, though one industry analyst warns the “forces of nature on U.S. oil production should not be overestimated – nor should their impact on demand be underestimated.” (Reuters)
• The U.S. oil industry is preparing for Hurricane Irma, as Texas refiners and pipelines are still in the process of restoring operations after Hurricane Harvey. (Platts)
• As Hurricane Irma nears Florida, the state is confronting the fact that rapid development makes its coastline even more vulnerable than it used to be. (New York Times)
• Duke Energy is preparing for Hurricane Irma following increased forecasts for it to significantly impact the Carolinas. (SC Now)
• Accelerating sea-level rise and intensifying storms are speeding up the erosion of Florida’s beaches.

South Carolina lawmakers question delay of nuclear plant audit

NUCLEAR: South Carolina lawmakers question why an audit finished 19 months ago on the now-abandoned Summer nuclear plant project was not released until now, as panels plan to meet next week to further investigate the multi-billion failure. (Post and Courier)

ALSO: Two nuclear plants in Florida are in Hurricane Irma’s projected path and may be shut down. (Miami Herald)

***SPONSORED LINK: Join Microsoft, Facebook, Walmart and other key players in Southeast energy at Infocast’s Southeast Renewable Energy Summit – November 1-3 in Atlanta. Register today!***

CLIMATE:
• Hurricanes Irma and Harvey have restarted the debate on climate change and warmer oceans. (McClatchy)
• Scientists say climate change didn’t cause Hurricane Irma, but did make it much stronger. (Bloomberg)
• Florida Gov. Rick Scott says he is not downplaying the dangers Hurricane Irma poses to this state, but has dodged questions on whether climate change is caused by humans, saying that he’s “not a scientist.” (SaintPetersBlog)

GASOLINE: Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Wednesday that gasoline shortages around the state are temporary and should be resolved before Hurricane Irma arrives there.