Daily Digest

Court revives ratepayer lawsuit over Georgia nuclear plant fees

NUCLEAR:
• The Georgia Court of Appeals revives a long-running ratepayer lawsuit against Georgia Power over fees to help pay for two reactors. (Southeast Energy News)
• A Miami-based citizens group asks to challenge the environmental impact statement filed for two more reactors at the Turkey Point plant. (PalmBeachPost.com)

COAL:
• The EPA is set today to make public its rejection of an air permit issued by Tennessee regulators for the TVA’s Bull Run power plant. (Electric Light & Power)
Retired miners anxiously await indications how President-elect Trump may act, even retroactively, on their benefits due to expire after Dec. 31. (Washington Post)
• Look to Michigan to see why it will be very difficult for President-elect Trump to revive the coal industry. (Vox)

COAL ASH: Companies that make liners for ash disposal pits are making strides to better guard against leaching. (Waste 360)

GRID: Providers of on-demand generation capacity in the PJM grid express disdain over its requirement that resources be available year-round. (Utility Dive)

PIPELINES: Piedmont Natural gas wants to build a new pipeline under the Cape Fear River to serve Wilmington. (Winston-Salem Journal)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: The director of the University of Central Florida’s Solar Energy Center sees the day when electric vehicles will recharge wirelessly. (Clean Technica)

CLIMATE:
Scientists in southern Louisiana express concern over what help, if any, the region will get from President-elect Trump to mitigate sea level rise. (WWL)
• Government scientists assess what it will take to preserve Jamestown, Virginia and other historical and cultural landmarks from rising sea levels. (U.S. Geological Survey)

NATURAL GAS: Federal regulators deny the Sierra Club’s request for a rehearing on their approval of a liquefied natural gas export project in Lake Charles, Louisiana. (Argus Media)

TRANSPORTATION: Lawmakers from Southern Florida grapple with how to ease traffic congestion in Miami-Dade County. (Miami Herald)

SOLAR: Key West, Florida turns on a system atop City Hall and weighs powering all of its electricity needs by adding to it. (The Citizen)

POLITICS: Updated results show Attorney General Roy Cooper now holds about an 8,000-vote lead over incumbent Pat McCrory in the race for governor. (Charlotte Business Journal)

WEST VIRGINIA: Citizens and elected officials look to clean up coal waste from the Cheat River and other locations to grow the state’s tourism industry. (Associated Press)

FLORIDA: The energy policies of President-elect Trump are not expected to have much, if any, impact on Florida. (WLRN)

COMMENTARY:
Dominion’s dirty power politics are led by its top two executives, Tom Farrell and Bob Blue. (Blue Virginia blog)
• An alternative weekly in Chattanooga heralds the city’s push for solar energy and sustainability. (The Pulse)
• A bulk purchasing co-op in Central Florida attracts 400 interested homeowners perhaps because of news coverage of the failed Amendment 1. (Orlando Sentinel)
• The defeat of Florida’s Amendment 1 may be instrumental in shifting the state’s energy priorities toward solar energy. (Fort Myers News-Press)

CORRECTION: A commentary item in last Tuesday’s digest was attributed to the wrong organization. It was written by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, not the Southern Environmental Law Center.

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