Daily Digest

Duke settles Clean Air Act violations for $5.4 million

POLLUTION: In a settlement with the EPA, Duke Energy will pay $5.4 million for Clean Air Act violations dating back to the 1990s. (New York Times)

SOLAR:
• A new report ranks North Carolina second in the U.S. for new solar construction, but an expiring state tax credit will likely slow future growth. (Charlotte Business Journal)
• Advocates say another report ranking North Carolina as a top solar state affirms the need to maintain existing clean-energy policies. (Associated Press)
• Work begins on a 30 MW solar facility at a Georgia naval base. (Atlanta Business Chronicle)
• A Virginia solar firm wins $225,000 in a state competition for startups. (Washington Business Journal)

UTILITIES: Duke Energy says it will continue to invest in clean energy, regardless of what happens in the North Carolina legislature. (Greensboro News & Record)

NATURAL GAS: A study finds natural gas pipeline replacement programs in cities like Durham, North Carolina have been effective in cutting methane leaks. (InsideClimate News)

OIL: A House subcommittee votes to lift the U.S. ban on crude oil exports. (The Hill)

OFFSHORE DRILLING:
• A federal report says workers reacted too slowly to stop a blowout on a Gulf drilling vessel in 2013. (Houston Chronicle)
• Shell is bringing the world’s largest offshore oil production vessel to drill in the Gulf of Mexico about 200 miles from New Orleans. (New Orleans Times-Picayune)
• A group of 300 businesses along the Atlantic coast send a letter urging President Obama to block offshore drilling. (The Hill)

COAL:
• The coal industry’s decline leaves Appalachian towns struggling to provide public services. (Bloomberg)
• Union members have few answers about how an Alabama coal firm’s bankruptcy will impact their pensions and other benefits. (Tuscaloosa News)

CLIMATE: Despite billions invested in infrastructure, experts are concerned New Orleans still isn’t adequately prepared for rising sea levels. (ClimateWire)

POLITICS: Environmentalists are pushing companies to leave the National Association of Manufacturers over its stance on pollution regulations. (National Journal)

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