Daily Digest

Environmental group seek rejection of Atlantic Coast Pipeline agreements

SOLAR: An Arkansas rural co-op receives national recognition for a unique solar project that is helping to retain a major employer. (Southeast Energy News)

ALSO: A new report shows North Carolina has seen the third-greatest increase in the U.S. in solar energy production since 2007. (News & Observer)

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PIPELINES:
• The Sierra Club wants North Carolina regulators to withdraw approval for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline contracts, saying the volume of natural gas initially negotiated is no longer needed. (Charlotte Business Journal)
• 
On the heels of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline’s favorable assessment from FERC, business developers in eastern North Carolina are hopeful companies will soon benefit from its natural gas. (Triangle Business Journal)

NUCLEAR:
• Santee Cooper will consider today a settlement deal to clarify what funds will be available from Toshiba, which could be on the hook for as much as $1.7 billion, to move forward with the Summer nuclear project. (Post and Courier)
• State regulators will address a dispute about how to handle Florida Power & Light’s controversial plans to add two nuclear reactors in Miami-Dade County. (The Ledger)

COAL ASH: Duke Energy is offering some North Carolina residents who live near its coal ash ponds money to help them transition to city water, though many are concerned about signing legal waivers. (WSOC)

CLEAN ENERGY: The president of Appalachian Power spoke to a Virignia Rotary club about adding wind and solar power to its portfolio, saying, “We’re trying to move to about 50 percent coal, and 50 percent renewables and some natural gas.” (Register-Herald)

WIND: Apex Clean Energy wants to begin construction on a Virginia wind farm by the end of the year, although it still does not have a power purchase agreement. (Roanoke Times)

CLIMATE: A look at how North Carolina’s coastal communities are preparing for rising sea levels. (WFAE)

COAL: The Trump administration received another extension to respond to former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship’s request that the U.S. Supreme Court hear an appeal of his conviction for his role in the 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine explosion. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

POWER PLANT: City council members have delayed a decision whether to allow Entergy to build a controversial power plant in New Orleans East after listening to lengthy comments from opponents of the project. (Times-Picayune)

FINANCING: Homeowners and businesses in Orlando and elsewhere in Florida have more options to finance PACE loans for solar panels and other energy-efficiency improvements. (Orlando Sentinel)

COMMENTARY:
• A newspaper editorial says because the U.S. is already in a strong energy position, North Carolina’s coast should not be exposed to the risks to its resources that offshore oil and gas drilling would bring. (News & Record)
• An agreement between some counties in Florida to fight climate change is an example of the impact that can be made with little support from the state or federal governments. (Tampa Bay Times)

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