Daily Digest

Proposal to dispose coal ash at Georgia landfill triggers fight

COAL ASH: Citing safety concerns, local residents build opposition to a plan to dispose coal ash at a southeast Georgia landfill(WABE Public Radio)

ALSO:
• Regardless of who foots the bill, a North Carolina county says it will supply safe water to its residents. (Salisbury Post)
Dominion Virginia Power challenges an environmental group’s claims about water safety near one of its ash ponds. (Chesterfield Observer)
• A compromise by North Carolina lawmakers to offer Duke Energy options for managing its ash is another step closer to final passage, but the legislation still faces hurdles. (Associated Press, Carolina Public Press)

POLICY: Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe fields criticism from all sides as he strives to guide energy development. (Style Weekly)

ELECTRIC VEHICLES: Tesla is in talks with gas station chain Sheetz about installing charging stations in some stations in North Carolina and other mid-Atlantic states. (The Washington Post)

WIND: A debate heats up in North Carolina over newly proposed restrictions near military bases. (Triangle Business Journal)

OFFSHORE DRILLING: Senators from North Carolina and other affected states aim for a vote this year on a new bill to increase states’ shares of drilling revenues. (The Hill)

NATURAL GAS:
• A gas processing plant in Mississippi shuts down after an explosion and fire; no injuries or damage outside the facility are reported. (Platts)
• The Sierra Club may shift its opposition to proposed export terminals in Louisiana and elsewhere from federal regulators to the Department of Energy. (Greenwire)

SOLAR:
• Florida Power & Light says it’s exploring the viability of a 1,300-acre solar farm in Alachua County. (WUFT Public Media)
• A 30-acre solar farm in Mississippi sourced from and financed by in-state companies nears its startup date. (WCBI)

FRACKING: As North Carolina and other states ban local restrictions, the U.S. Conference of Mayors moves to secure controls. (Colorlines)

GRID: The independent monitor of the wholesale power market that includes most of Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi and part of Kentucky is not sending “efficient” investment signals. (Platts)

VW EMISSIONS SCANDAL: Kentucky’s attorney general estimates affected residents collectively will receive more than $100 million in settlement funds. (WKU Public Radio)

NUCLEAR: Attorneys for the federal government and South Carolina are due in court today about a lawsuit over an unfinished plant to produce commercial nuclear fuel. (WSB)

COAL: The United Mine Workers in West Virginia and elsewhere reject a proposed labor contract with Murray Energy and other companies. (Charleston Gazette-Mail)

COMMENTARY: The Clean Power Plan offers consumers in the Southeast tools to conserve electricity. (Natural Resources Defense Council)

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